Critical Updates
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The Spiller Road proposal is being introduced to Council on Tuesday, February 16th for first reading. The agenda package with the full staff report is on the City website (please copy and paste links below into your browser) https://www.penticton.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/meetings/agendas/zregular-council-meeting-agenda-2021-02-12.pdf

There is additional background, technical documents and feedback opportunities on Shape Your City here:  https://www.shapeyourcitypenticton.ca/1050-spiller-road-vinterra-penticton

 

·         City staff will be bringing forward their report on the 1050 Spiller Road proposal to Council on February 16th. At that meeting, Council will consider first reading of the amending bylaws and to begin public consultation. 

·         Should Council support first reading and direct staff to proceed with public consultation, staff will begin to formally gather public feedback through surveys, feedback forms and other activities. 

·         City staff would then report back the results of the public consultation and provide recommendations for next steps, such as a public hearing or direction for changes to the plans based on the public feedback etc. The reporting back of information will likely occur in May. 

Please include your feedback  as part of the engagement process and participate in the forums/discussion/Q&A currently available on the City website now.  It is super important to ask hard questions and stick to facts, critical issues and the guidance of the OCP whenever possible.  

On February 16, Penticton Council and Mayor voted 6-0 in a unanimous decision to deny Canadian Horizons' rezoning application at 1050 spiller road.  We are grateful to the communities support including the letter from 44 businesses along the Naramata Bench that supported the initiative to stop the rezoning.  Special thanks to all Penticton Council and Mayor from the farmers, wineries, businesses, and residents of the Naramata Bench. 

 

 

 

 

 

Upcoming election of new member of Penticton Council

 

Many members of our organization reside in Penticton and have a keen interest in the June 19 by-election. In order to solicit the views on matters of importance to the community we have sent out a request to each candidate seeking a written response to the two questions below:  

 

Question 1. Which of the following challenges facing Penticton City Council do you consider to be the most important, and why? If elected, how will you assist in addressing this issue?

 

(a) Protecting the environment

(b) Homelessness

(c) Lack of affordable housing

(d) Economic recovery and growth

(e) Other

 

Question 2. Please explain your defense or critique of two recent land use decisions made by City Council, including:

 

(a) Council’s rejection of the 1050 Spiller Road subdivision proposal, and

(b) another land use matter of your own choosing.

 

 

Responses from candidates in order received:

 

Karen Brownlee, May 25, 2021:

 

Question 1. Which of the following challenges facing Penticton City Council do you consider to be the most important, and why? If elected, how will you assist in addressing this issue?

 

(a) Protecting the environment

(b) Homelessness

(c) Lack of affordable housing

(d) Economic recovery and growth

(e) Other

 

Question 1 response:  “This is a tough one as all of them are important. I believe Economic recovery and growth would be the one that would need to be addressed first as the other issues that are listed here link directly to the dollars that come into Penticton.  Each item is in need of taxpayer’s money in some form or another.  As a councilor, I would want to know how the city is spending our tax dollars to ensure the homeless, affordable housing, protecting our environment and other issues are properly getting the share they need.  As well, business is what drives this city and we would need to look into the reasons why tourists choose a different city other than Penticton to holiday.  We would also need to look into why the locals are shopping elsewhere.  Knowing the answers to these questions ensures that we can devise a plan and strategy working toward a stronger economy in the future.

 

Question 2. Please explain your defense or critique of two recent land use decisions made by City Council, including:

 

(a) Council’s rejection of the 1050 Spiller Road subdivision proposal, and

(b) another land use matter of your own choosing.

 

Question 2 (a) response:  “I was extremely happy to have it rejected. I supported those who fought the good fight.  It encroached ALR, a plan our forefathers and foremothers placed on our land to ensure it stays farmland.

Question 2 (b) response: Land use...As derelict homes (druggie houses) get torn down, it is nice to see clean and beautiful homes being built.  Nevertheless, we must be vigilant in ensuring the developer builds a suitable home shape, design etc. into the proper neighborhood.  We have neighborhoods for single family dwellings, apartment/condo dwellers, duplex-4 plex buildings.  We have a template for these designs for buildings for a reason.

As a councillor, I will ensure I work with the neighborhood and the developer to ensure the OCP gets utilized fully to everyone's benefit.”

 

Keith Macintyre – May 27, 2021:

Question 1. Which of the following challenges facing Penticton City Council do you consider to be the most important, and why? If elected, how will you assist in addressing this issue?

 

(a) Protecting the environment

(b) Homelessness

(c) Lack of affordable housing

(d) Economic recovery and growth

(e) Other

 

Question 1 response: I think the biggest challenge facing Penticton City Council is the continued interference by the Provincial government in our affairs.  The triple threat of forcing us to open a homeless shelter without our consultation, ripping Pathways Addictions from our community and forcing us to pay a million dollars without warning for the Primary Care Network shows that they don't think they need to consult with communities and will impose their will on us with threats and intimidation tactics.  Seeing UBCM and multiple communities in BC in support of us has been inspiring.  While I don't agree with expensive lawsuits I do agree with continuing to push back on the province to make decisions for our community that are right for us.  I just read that the province has just purchased several motel properties to build 'affordable housing'.  The best way to create more affordable housing is to reduce regulations and remove the many many taxes and fees that drive up the costs of homes in our province.  I would also immediately suggest that we should ask for exemptions from any provincial restrictions and allow our businesses to operate freely, as the data does not justify us having restrictions on our lives”
 

Question 2. Please explain your defense or critique of two recent land use decisions made by City Council, including:

 

(a) Council’s rejection of the 1050 Spiller Road subdivision proposal, and

(b) another land use matter of your own choosing.

 

Question 2 response: “I think that the council is overstepping their bounds and restricting property owners from doing what they see fit with their rightfully purchased property.  Do we have property rights in Canada?  I support the Spiller Road subdivision.  I also support the proposed apartment complexes on Green Avenue.  The land developer paid well above market value for the property.  The buildings they are proposing are appropriate and will provide much needed housing for Penticton.  With the influx of people moving to the Okanagan our rental supply is diminishing and is worse than ever before.  We need to get out of the way of developers and allow them to use the property that they have purchased as they see fit.”

 

James Miller – May 27, 2021

Question 1. Which of the following challenges facing Penticton City Council do you consider to be the most important, and why? If elected, how will you assist in addressing this issue?

 

(a) Protecting the environment

(b) Homelessness

(c) Lack of affordable housing

(d) Economic recovery and growth

(e) Other

 

Question 1 response: Each of the cited issues is critical, complex, and has related consequences for the health and success of the City if not addressed.  The most important and immediate challenge, in my view, is homelessness. I fully support the present council in their attempts to achieve a fair, productive and compassionate solution to Penticton's transitional housing and temporary shelter issue.

Penticton has been very generous in its support for our less-fortunate.  Additionally, as seen in the 2021 RDOS Housing Needs Assessment Report, Penticton has the only transitional housing facilities and shelters in the region, and deals with more than its proportional share of homelessness, as hard to house individuals from surrounding communities find themselves here to access needed services.  Penticton has generously agreed to zoning amendments for supportive housing facilities, plus the City has faced the extra costs involved in extra policing and emergency services. 

I'm deeply sympathetic for those less fortunate, I do, however, feel that our senior population is not being unreasonable when their expectations are to enjoy a short walk where they feel safe or secure in taking their grandchildren to a park. Also, the safety of shelter and transitional housing tenants is at risk when facilities are inadequately managed.  BC Housing and Minister Eby must share in finding solutions to the current operational shortcomings of these facilities, in partnership with City Council, staff and local support organizations. 

The abrupt cutting of Pathways Addictions Centre funding is of great concern. I have lobbied for reinstatement of Pathways funding and have regularly attended rallies to have those funds restored. I believe that unique, successful services such as Pathways and Discovery House are needed. When clients’ addictions are successfully addressed, they are far less likely to become homeless.  If elected, I will be a non-partisan member of council, working collaboratively on this issue, which has regrettably become political and divisive.”

Question 2. Please explain your defense or critique of two recent land use decisions made by City Council, including:

 

(a) Council’s rejection of the 1050 Spiller Road subdivision proposal, and

(b) another land use matter of your own choosing.

 

Question 2 (a) response: “I agreed with council's unanimous decision to deny the Spiller Road development.

Penticton’s widely supported 2019-2045 OCP was the result of excellent public engagement and input from the OCP Task Force, City staff and Council, and thousands of citizens.  Spiller Road was not a fit with that OCP vision. The non-local developers were requesting a tremendous number of concessions from the City. A housing development should be good for all parties involved - beginning with the citizens.

Often forgotten by the project’s proponents was that essential consultation with the Penticton Indian Band wasn’t undertaken by the Developer. The present PIB chief as well as the past two were all in opposition.  Many Naramata Bench wineries and other businesses, officially opposed the development. Our tourism and agricultural industries rely on the Bench and its rural “brand”.

I respectfully disagree with those Spiller Road neighbours who penned letters to local media suggesting that increased housing inventory results in lower home prices. This theory has been disproven time and time again by economists.

Question 2(b) response: “As for a second, land use matter, I'm disappointed that the Walker Residence at 452 Lakeshore Road, built in the 1930s, was rezoned to allow demolition and construction of a fourplex. The owners claimed they didn't know it was on the heritage registry. Had I been a councilor at the time, I would have asked questions at the hearing, i.e.” Who was your realtor and did he/she not mention this at any point?”  Penticton’s best examples of vernacular architecture and mature landscaping can be jeopardized by development which ignores those factors. Certainly redevelopment is welcomed in some areas of Penticton, however, our built heritage also deserves attention and respect as we move forward to densify the city’s core.”

 

Katie O’Kell – May 26, 2021

Question 1. Which of the following challenges facing Penticton City Council do you consider to be the most important, and why? If elected, how will you assist in addressing this issue?

 

(a) Protecting the environment

(b) Homelessness

(c) Lack of affordable housing

(d) Economic recovery and growth

(e) Other

 

Question 1 response: “Addressing the lack of affordable housing will positively impact all the other options listed. My approach to fixing the lack of affordable housing will be environmentally sustainable for the long term, preserving the beautiful wilderness that we are fortunate to be surrounded by. With affordable housing, the working poor will have a place to live and not be forced into RVs and tents up in the hills.

Economic recovery can happen, because small businesses will finally have staff that can afford to live here and work. Those staff will also be living here, spending here, and positively contributing to the economy.

I support encouraging density and reducing urban sprawl. Increasing density allows us to support our growing population without encroaching on the pristine wilderness that we have. It makes the cost of delivering services such as water, garbage disposal and sewage cheaper per capita, while simultaneously increasing our tax base. More housing means, historically, that the average cost to rent will be reduced. It will allow people to move here, increasing our workforce. As someone who runs a business in Naramata, I know firsthand how difficult it is to find staff. To be clear, ‘density’ does not mean hundreds of 12-storey apartment buildings. Infilling run-down houses with duplexes and carriage houses would have a tremendous impact.

If elected, I would suggest imposing a density tax on strategic spots in Penticton. A density tax requires developers to build housing that has a certain density. Developers failing the density requirement can either guarantee that a certain number of units will be available at less than market value, or pay a ‘density tax’ for failing to meet the density requirements. The funds from the density tax can be used to purchase strategic properties, and/or build housing units that meet the City’s needs.”

 Question 2. Please explain your defense or critique of two recent land use decisions made by City Council, including:

 

(a) Council’s rejection of the 1050 Spiller Road subdivision proposal, and

(b) another land use matter of your own choosing.

 

Question 2 (a) response: “I support the rejection of the Spiller Road development. The proposal would have been a detriment to the character of the Naramata Bench. It would have encroached on vital wilderness, Native rights, and increased traffic to an unsafe level on Naramata Road. I feared that unhappy residents would have eventually pushed to close the landfill, a vital service to residents of Penticton and Naramata alike. Furthermore, adding to urban sprawl is not a good idea. Long term, sprawl ends up costing municipalities more money in the cost to deliver services than the new tax base provides. While we need more housing, this was not the way to obtain that.

Question 2 (b) response: “I am disheartened by the rejection of the apartment proposal at the Kampe property. Mr. Kampe was an extraordinary philanthropist who deeply cared for Penticton. I think he would have been proud to know that his property was helping to solve Penticton’s housing crisis. Changes should have been made to the proposed building to fit the neighbourhood. With a highway on one side and WalMart on the other, the suggestion of a park on that site would have been misplaced. The speed at which the new Skaha apartments were filled demonstrates a severe need for more housing units in Penticton. Denying apartments there was a disservice to both Mr. Kampe’s legacy, and the potential of the property.”

 

Steve Brown – May 26, 2021

Question 1. Which of the following challenges facing Penticton City Council do you consider to be the most important, and why? If elected, how will you assist in addressing this issue?

 

(a) Protecting the environment

(b) Homelessness

(c) Lack of affordable housing

(d) Economic recovery and growth

(e) Other       

 

Question 1 response: “No one issue is more important than another for those involved in the issue. No councilor is going to know all the issues and all the problems throughout the entire community, so they rely on groups like yours to advocate and bring the issues to the forefront for recognition, discussion, and a reasonable resolution.

Protecting the Environment from a regulatory standpoint is dictated by the Provincial and Federal Governments. The City while a partner in these endeavours is in a supportive role. A visit to the City website lists its many programs which it promotes on behalf of the protection agencies. The City needs to continue in this role and champion any other environmental causes that are identified as unique to our environment.

Homelessness and Affordable housing. These two issues require a huge commitment by Senior levels of government. The City has at its disposal, planners, bylaws, and regulatory processes which it can bring to the table. What it does not have are the financial resources to make affordability a reality. Affordable housing in its many forms for the many groups in need, currently is only achievable through subsidies or concessions provided by senior levels of government. Developers are looking for a return on their investment. The cost of the investment and construction does not reduce because the result is supposed to be “affordable”.

Economic Recovery and Growth. A working task force made up of the Chamber of Commerce, Penticton Business Improvement Area, Industrial Development Association, Tourism and Department of Economic Development needs to be established immediately. Their goal is to identify opportunities, support existing and new business ideas and reduce bylaws, obstructions, and processes with a vision for Penticton in the

future. The City’s role would be to provide professional leadership in a qualified, experienced specialist to coordinate the group but not impose the outcome as their own but rather through consultation and consensus.”

Question 2. Please explain your defense or critique of two recent land use decisions made by City Council, including:

 

(a) Council’s rejection of the 1050 Spiller Road subdivision proposal, and

(b) another land use matter of your own choosing.

 

Question 2 (a) response: “I would have rejected the Spiller Road subdivision proposal as it was too far outside the guidelines of the Official Community Plan. I would have been fine with a proposal that was more in line with the OCP. Development is inevitable but it must be controlled. Development for the sake of development at all costs is not what most want or why we live here. The strain on the infrastructure, environment and ambiance of the Naramata Bench would be lost forever”.

Question 2(b) response: “The Dave Kampe property is privately held and will be developed at some point. Given the need for affordable housing this property and location may lend itself better to affordable Senior’s independent and visitable housing or below market complex for working families if appropriate government money is injected, as opposed to a large apartment complex at mostly market rates. Shopping, schools, and medical services all within walking distance. As previously mentioned, government money will need to be involved if this is to be affordable and the owners are to realize the market value of the land.”

 

Amy Boultbee - May 27, 2021

Question 1. Which of the following challenges facing Penticton City Council do you consider to be the most important, and why? If elected, how will you assist in addressing this issue?

 

(a) Protecting the environment

(b) Homelessness

(c) Lack of affordable housing

(d) Economic recovery and growth

(e) Other

 

Question 1 response: “I believe constituents in Penticton are looking for city council to address the urgent issues of lack of affordable housing, homelessness and economic recovery as primary issues in this election. Currently, Penticton lacks housing inventory, which is contributing to housing challenges and high prices. Healthy and thriving communities consist of diverse economic sectors. If housing costs are high, businesses are challenged to hire workers, particularly in service, retail and tourism jobs.  The RDOS Housing Needs Assessment states that in Penticton, projected household growth with the City is expected to require an average of 91 net new owned housing units and 54 net new rental units per year into 2026, averaging 145 new units annually, and that “while recent development represents progress towards reducing core housing need, more could be done over the next five years to provide affordable and appropriate housing. Actions are not simple and would require collaboration, cooperation, and coordination.”

I believe that thoughtful and responsible development, in accordance with the city's Official Community Plan, is needed in order to address the housing shortage. Addressing the housing shortage is one component needed to spur economic recovery and ensure Penticton has an economy where small businesses can attract workers, and growing families can find appropriate housing. 

Homelessness is a pressing issue affecting many communities and has become particularly acute in Penticton in recent years. Mental health, addiction, and poverty prevention are at the root of the problem, which leaves many municipalities to deal with the downstream effects which the federal and provincial government are the levels of government empowered to address these issues. For Penticton, collaboration with other levels of government, advocating for adequate wrap around services, and consulting with service providers who work with those who are experiencing homlessness is necessary to address the issue in our community. 

Question 2. Please explain your defense or critique of two recent land use decisions made by City Council, including:

 

(a) Council’s rejection of the 1050 Spiller Road subdivision proposal, and

(b) another land use matter of your own choosing.

Question 2 (a) response:  As a private citizen, I was a supporter of the Vinterra project at 1050 Spiller road. I believe council should have allowed the Vinterra project to proceed to the public consultation phase in order to determine what Penticton voters actually felt about the project. A robust public consultation is key to any major project that affects Penticton neighborhoods, and it is unfortunate that city council didn't take the opportunity to give Penticton voters a voice with respect to that particular project. Listening to voters and enacting the projects and policies that they support is at the heart of municipal democracy, and would be a key feature of my tenure as city councillor should I be elected. 

 

Question 2 (b) response: “Recently, city council turned down an opportunity to develop the Kampe property, which I felt was an acceptable decision until such time as a more thorough public consultation process has been undertaken, but should the property be found not to be environmentally sensitive; it could be a promising site for much needed multi-family housing in Penticton”. 

 

Karen Hansen - May 27, 2021

Question 1. Which of the following challenges facing Penticton City Council do you consider to be the most important, and why? If elected, how will you assist in addressing this issue?

 

(a) Protecting the environment

(b) Homelessness

(c) Lack of affordable housing

(d) Economic recovery and growth

(e) Other

 

Question 1 response:  “My response (e) includes each of the above challenges facing our City. There is a general community perception that Penticton is “unsafe”.  Citizens have expressed concerns about the social disorder they see in the form of homelessness, addiction, and an increase in property crime.

Addressing the issue of Community Safety & Security would be my #1 priority.

 

I have spent a 29 year career in the RCMP, problem solving, working toward building consensus with people and agencies in conflict.

 

As a Councillor, I will work to ensure that the City’s response is one which brings all stakeholders together, working toward a coordinated and intelligence-led response.

 

Responsible agencies operating within our community must be held accountable for their promises and their actions, or inactions.

 

Question 2. Please explain your defense or critique of two recent land use decisions made by City Council, including:

 

(a) Council’s rejection of the 1050 Spiller Road subdivision proposal, and

(b) another land use matter of your own choosing.


Question 2 (a) response: “I would agree with the Council's rejection of the 1050 Spiller Road Subdivision proposal, as presented. The Naramata Bench is recognized internationally for the wines that it produces - it is the "Napa Valley of the North".

The site is located at what many consider to be the start of the Naramata Bench Wine Country. Tourists are drawn to the patch work of working farms, orchards, and vineyards that make up the Bench. While densification can and should take place in the Downtown, and other urban neighbourhoods, within Penticton, the proposed development simply does not fit into the landscape, environment, and existing infrastructure.

This area is currently zoned as "country residential", and caution would need to be exercised in any proposal seeking to increase the densification with this area”.

 

Question 2(b) response: “City Hall's rejection of the Water Slide development proposal at Skaha Lake Park - Our parkland and greenspaces are an integral part of our community.

 

Over and over, I have watched this community rally against development(s) that would take away from the natural beauty that Penticton possesses. Green spaces and parks are needed for our families to relax or play, for tourists to come and enjoy, and for the variety of festivals that celebrate all that we have come to be known for. To lose these areas of refuge and celebration, would be to lose the natural beauty that we have been blessed with.

 

Our community has overwhelmingly stated, these green spaces must be protected. Once they are gone, we can never get them back.”

 

Jason Cox - May 28, 2021

Question 1. Which of the following challenges facing Penticton City Council do you consider to be the most important, and why? If elected, how will you assist in addressing this issue?

 

(a) Protecting the environment

(b) Homelessness

(c) Lack of affordable housing

(d) Economic recovery and growth

(d) Other

Question 1 response: “Because your second question focuses on housing issues, for this question, I would like to talk about homelessness. I think when homelessness is discussed in the community, there are actually four overlapping issues of poverty, addictions, mental health and crime being lumped together. Unfortunately, in recent years the current and previous councils have not addressed these nuances in their response. When all you see are nails, you think all you need are hammers. The truth is each of these issues require a different response and only with a complete toolkit will we see a difference. As, a three-time elected president of the local Chamber of Commerce, I have spent years lobbying and working with the province on issues important to Penticton.

If elected to council, I would use resources available like UBCM to work with the province for changes to stop catch and release of criminals and for more street level support for mental health and addictions. I would also recommend to the city budget process that rather than spending hundreds of thousands of dollars for bylaw to push the frictions caused by people experiencing poverty around and suing panhandlers, we could be investing with local not for profit agencies for programs to help people out of poverty and off the streets. By closing gaps in our social infrastructure, we will actually unburden the local RCMP from dealing with issues of poverty so that they can focus on issues of crime. In addressing homelessness, I believe in a housing first approach, but that does not mean housing only. Simply warehousing people without supports has proven to be ineffective and detrimental. I have served on the boards of local agencies supporting each of these sectors and am prepared with the complete perspective and the solutions to make a difference. 

 

Question 2. Please explain your defense or critique of two recent land use decisions made by City Council, including:

 

(a) Council’s rejection of the 1050 Spiller Road subdivision proposal, and

(b) another land use matter of your own choosing.

 

Question 2(a) response: “I served on the 2018 Official Community Plan Task force that created the current OCP. Much informed and considerate work by thoughtful and diligent local community minded volunteers went into that document. While plans like this are always living documents and subject to change, I believe that it is too soon to be making decisions that far exceed the intent of this document. That is why I feel that the decision to decline the proposal at Spiller road was the correct one. The OCP sets this area as Country Residential and Mobile Home Park. I believe that if a developer wants to work with the OCP in this area they will actually achieve an opportunity for accessibility to market priced homes and more accessible mobile homes.

 

Question 2(b) response:  "The second land use decision I would like to discuss is this council's decision to purchase the former Greyhound Bus Depot above the market price. This decision did two things, it took tax payer money (which is now needed with the pandemic closing the SOEC, PTCC and other revenue sources for the city) and tied that money up in land which is underutilized as a parking lot. The OCP calls for more development in the downtown. If elected to council, I would work to see the city either sell lands that in owns like this one to allow for more rental units on the market. More units would increase the supply and pressure prices down. To ensure that a development on the Ellis Street lands was affordable, council could either work with BC Housing and a local not-for -profit to build supportive housing for working people, families or seniors. Alternatively, council could work with a buyer/builder to provide density bonusses or tax incentives in exchange for percentage of below market rents thus meeting both the needs of the developer and the community.”

 

Isaac Gilbert May 28, 2021

Question 1. Which of the following challenges facing Penticton City Council do you consider to be the most important, and why? If elected, how will you assist in addressing this issue?

 

(a) Protecting the environment

(b) Homelessness

(c) Lack of affordable housing

(d) Economic recovery and growth

(d) Other

Question 1 response: “The challenge facing Penticton is both Lack of Affordable Housing and Homelessness. Both are linked to one another and also will affect the Environment, from pressures from our population growing to development, and Economic Recovery and Sustainability, from not having affordable housing options for workers. This challenge exists because of our low vacancy rates in apartments, barriers for home builders to meaningfully build denser neighbourhoods in the core of Penticton, and inflating house prices. If elected I will implement my platform which will see City owned zoned to be used for affordable housing options for singles, families, and seniors. Along with this rezoning I would push to establish a City Public Housing Authority to coordinate with senior levels of government, the non-profit housing sector, and cooperatives to construct affordable housing.

To bring meaningful development into the core of the City I will push the city to work creatively with the home builders and developers to waive barriers like mandatory parking requirements for new buildings. Promoting the city be more accessible by walking, biking, and public transportation.

 

Question 2. Please explain your defense or critique of two recent land use decisions made by City Council, including:

 

(a) Council’s rejection of the 1050 Spiller Road subdivision proposal, and

(b) another land use matter of your own choosing.

 

Question 2 response:  "Yes, this project would have brought more housing to Penticton. This project was not accepted by the Penticton Indian Band, it brings in more car focused sprawl, and is setting a trend of moving into agricultural land. I want to bring meaningful reconciliation to the City of Penticton with Syilx Okanagan People and specifically the Penticton Indian Band. For reconciliation to happen meaningful consultation must occur and be supported by the City of Penticton. This project did not meet those criteria. It also promotes car focus subdivision which in the long-term bankrupt municipalities. Subdivisions like 1050 Spiller Road do not make enough revenue 25 years in the future to cover the repairs and replacements of its infrastructure. This moves revenue produced by the core of the city to subsidize the subdivision. Finally, we live in a delicate environment that receives enormous pressures from human activity. Accepting projects like this continues the culture of sprawling and removing more forest and grasslands. Unless there is meaningful consultation with the Syilx Okanagan People, adjusting the taxes to compensate the lack of funds for the future, and ensuring our environment is protected I am going to challenge these projects and vote the way the City Council voted”.